Elizabeth Knox Online

The proverbial “they” say that writing a book is like having a baby. Since I’ve had the honor and privilege of doing both in the past year, I think that makes me eminently qualified to evaluate the comparison!

Here’s my take on the similarities:

Anticipation

8 months pregnant and working on book edits. (No, I don't usually put cucumbers on my eyes, Andy was making a salad and brought them to me... then thought it would be funny to take a picture)

8 months pregnant and working on book edits. (No, I don't usually put cucumbers on my eyes, Andy was making a salad and brought them to me... then thought it would be funny to take a picture)

I knew the book when I was “carrying” it better than I knew that little human inside me. The book made sense. I knew what I wanted to happen with it. But now that it’s “happened," I’m still not sure what all will come of it.

When I was pregnant, the baby was a stranger (and honestly, that continued on for at least the first three months of his life). I knew I was supposed to be excited, but I wasn’t sure what I was excited about. Now that he’s here, and I’m getting to know him, I’m totally enamored with him. But I still don’t know what the future holds for all of us, so I feel like I’m still watching and waiting.

Lesson Learned: Many things we long for and work hard for are still kind of uncertain even after we “achieve” them.

Sleep Deprivation
Many times when I was working on the book, I couldn’t shut my brain off and would stay up way too late. I also got up early to write before work, and sacrificed sleep for this goal.

When I was pregnant, people told me to stock up on sleep while I could, and I thought, “Right now? When I can’t get comfortable and as soon as I do I have to get up to pee?” But now I see how right they were.  Sleep has been really challenging for our family, and I don’t think I knew what sleep deprivation was before we went from a family of two to three.

Lesson Learned: I felt accomplished when I would stay up late to write or have an “aha” moment that resulted from the discipline of early morning writing time.  Midnight snuggles are fun. But from now on, I promise to go to bed as soon as I have the opportunity. Brilliant ideas, charming babies, or not! (at least for the next 5 years)

The Need for Community
I could not have written the book without the help of so many people.

The support of my family and friends has been critical to having a baby. From Andy’s coaching while I was pregnant and in labor, to our family swooping in soon after bringing meals and washing clothes, to our neighbors who babysit now.

Lesson Learned: Big things are nearly impossible to do alone.

Anyone want to babysit?

Writing with a sleeping baby on my lap in January (he's in his Christmas PJs)

Writing with a sleeping baby on my lap in January (he's in his Christmas PJs)

Pain and Distress
Emotionally, this book has caused some tension, frustration, tears, and fear.  Why am I even doing this? Why is it so hard? I’ve banged my head against many a table, wall, or husband’s chest through this process, but it has not really caused me any physical pain.

Thankfully, I didn’t have a very emotional pregnancy – I was generally even-keeled (and yes, I checked with Andy – he agreed). And the baby himself hasn’t caused a lot of emotional anguish yet (but he’s not a toddler or a teenager yet).  But as for physical pain: nothing, nothing… n.o.t.h.i.n.g. compares to childbirth on the pain scale. Nothing.

Lesson Learned: Both have their unique points that trigger emotional and physical pain. But anything worth doing is worth committing emotional energy to. And sometimes important things are really painful, but it doesn’t make them less important.

And while we’re on the subject – no – kidney stones are not the same as childbirth. Just for the record.

 

Jr. Editor hard at work reviewing the final manuscript

Jr. Editor hard at work reviewing the final manuscript

Identity
Am I an author? It feels funny to say that. And am I an author even if people think the book is bunk?

I know I’m a mother now, but it still doesn’t feel quite real.

And how does being an author or a mother fit in with my other identities? As a Christian, a wife, a friend, an employee, a colleague?

Both the book and the baby are each a dream, something born of you, something you tie much of your expectations, hopes, and identity into.

Lesson Learned: You aren’t supposed to tie all of your identity into either. You are supposed to raise your child to become an adult – separate from you. And when you write a book, it is the gift you are giving to the world.

In Conclusion
The proverbial "they" were right - these two big life events have a lot in common. You anticipate them, you invest in them, people tell you what they're like but it's hard to understand until you go through them yourself, you endure anguish for them, you learn to rely on others to help you do them well, you give up other things in life to make time for them.

There's always the uncertainty, there's always the sacrifice, and there's never a perfect time to pursue it, but I hope that whatever your dream is - you go for it!

bookbaby

This kid kills me with that jack-o-lantern smile!

2 COMMENTS ON THIS POST To “Is Writing a Book like Having a Baby?”

  • Frutke

    October 15, 2013 at 4:15 pm

    Best of luck, Elizabeth.
    May I recommend http://www.hanselman.com/babysmash/ ?
    🙂
    There’s a version that’ll work in your browser too at http://www.hanselman.com/babysmashsl/

  • Elizabeth

    October 16, 2013 at 6:58 pm

    Jason – that’s awesome! Although those babies are much gentler on the keybord than my kid (but with a name like babysmash, I’m guessing they knew that and their kids have just played with it too much!)

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